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County Secures $400,000 FEMA Reimbursement for September Flood

The Fremont County Department Transportation cataloged damage to 275 locations on county roads in last September's flash flood damage

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The Fremont County Office of Emergency Management and the Fremont County Department of Transportation were successful in seeking financial reimbursement for the county’s emergency response to the flash flooding that hit Fremont County last September.    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  Branch Director Roger Jones of Denver notified Emergency Management Director Steve Morrisey that the county will receive $400,364 in reimbursement for the cost of emergency road repairs following the September 11th—13th flood.

The reimbursement represents 75 percent of the cost that Fremont County incurred in materials, labor, and equipment to deal with the flood damage that was assessed across 250 different locations in Fremont County.   The only amount not reimbursed was $1,400 spent on inspections of county roads where there was no apparent damage.

District 3 Commissioner Ed Norden commended the work of Morrisey in coordinating the detailed work on the reports that had to be filed with FEMA.   Norden also commended the work of County Department of Transportation Director Tony Adamic and his crews who documented all of the work that had to be performed in the field.    Norden said the money the county invested several years ago in a computer software program that tracks all equipment, labor, and material expense on every mile of county road certainly paid off for documentation of the September flood emergency.